UPCOMING Events at Angelika studios

Click here for Artist's Lunchtime

Click here for Wanderer

Click here for Future Shorts Film Festival

Click here for The Modernist Coin Wash

Film Group

The Film group is held at Angelika Studios at 6.30 pm on the first Wednesday of every month (Except August and January). Admission £4.50 includes refreshments. The film will be followed by an informal discussion.

Weds October 7th

Film: The lady vanishes

Director: Alfred Hitchcock

Running time: 92 mins

Certificate: U

This month our film has been chosen by Matthew Macaulay, our guest curator from Pluspace, Coventry who is bringing the exhibition Wanderer to Angelika Studios in October

At first glance The Lady Vanishes appears to be a frothy, lightweight treat; a testament to Alfred Hitchcock's nimble touch. This snappy, sophisticated romantic thriller begins innocently enough, as a contingent of eccentric tourists spend the night in a picture-postcard village inn nestled in the Swiss Alps before setting off on the train the next morning. In a wonderfully Hitchcockian twist, on meeting, cute, attractive young Iris (Margaret Lockwood) clashes with brash music student Gilbert (Michael Redgrave) when his nocturnal concerts give her no peace. She gets him kicked out of his room, so he barges in on hers. True love is inevitable, but not before they are both plunged into an international conspiracy. The next day on the train, kindly old Mrs Froy (Dame May Whitty) vanishes from her train car without a trace and the once quarrelsome couple unite to search the train and uncover a dastardly plot. No one is as he or she seems, but sorting out the villains from the merely mysterious is a challenge in itself, as our innocents abroad face resistance from the entire passenger list.

Hitchcock effortlessly navigates this vivid thriller from light comedy to high tension and back again, creating one of his most enchanting and entertaining mysteries. Though this wasn't his final British film before departing for Hollywood (that honour goes to Jamaica Inn), many critics prefer to think of this as his fond farewell to the British Film Industry. --Sean Axmaker